Give customers, clients, and employees, context

So, I needed to change my address on my car insurance policy. I hopped online and clicked the “change address” link. The first thing that popped up was a question that had zero to do with changing my address. Or, at least that’s what it appeared like to me. I wasn’t even sure which option to choose. But, I guessed, and up came a box for the address change. OK, great! Then, after changing my address, the required questionnaire that followed was long and asking me questions about my policy that had nothing to do with the change of address. Then—deep breath–after answering the questions, my monthly payment went up! For changing my freaking address.

 

At that point, I shut down the web and called an operator. She explained to me why the process of changing my address included the convoluted process I had just experienced. It sort of made sense.

 

And therein lies the problem. There was absolutely no context or explanation given to the “whys” and “wherefores” of the process. It made no sense to me, was confusing and wasted 30 minutes of my day.

 

Learning Point: Your clients, customers and even your employees will (often) not understand internal processes that are second nature to you. Provide them context and you will find them happier and more willing to engage in your necessary policies and processes.

 

Ask: What about this process won’t make sense to an outsider OR an insider (whose home is in a different place in the organization)?

2009-06-03T19:32:40-04:00

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Written by Dave Fleming